Welcome to Elizabeth Olsen Source: your best source for all things related to Elizabeth Olsen. Elizabeth's breakthrough came in 2011 when she starred in critically-acclaimed movies Martha Marcy May Marlene and Silent House. She made her name in indie movies until her role in 2014 blockbuster Godzilla and then as Scarlet Witch/Wanda Maximoff in Marvel's Avengersand Captain America movies. Elizabeth starred in and was an Executive Producer for Facebook Watch's "Sorry For Your Loss". She is currently starring in WandaVision, the first Marvel TV Series on Disney+. She will also be in Marvel's Dr. Strange sequel and hopefully we'll see another indie movie from her! Enjoy the many photos(including lots of exclusives!), articles, and videos on our site!
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Press: Doctor Strange 2 Star Elizabeth Olsen Expects to Return to the MCU

COMIC BOOK:There are rarely any guarantees in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but Elizabeth Olsen feels incredibly confident that Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness won’t be her last time appearing in the franchise. We know that Benedict Cumberbatch’s Doctor Strange will be coming back to the franchise in the future, and the fact that the film was America Chavez’s MCU debut seems to guarantee her return as well. Wanda doesn’t that guarantee, at least not yet. Olsen still thinks that Wanda’s story isn’t finished.

“It’s weird that I’m expecting to return but no one’s told me I’m doing anything,” Olsen told Variety in a recent interview. “But in my mind, I’m just making the assumption that they’ll have me again. I don’t know to what capacity, but I hope I’m back. I hope there’s also more fun to be had in something different. Where do we go? I feel like we’ve done so much with her. It’s been really a wild couple years with her.”

As Olsen said, Wanda has been through quite a lot in recent years. Before the new Doctor Strange adventure, the character was at the center of the mysterious WandaVision story, which put her grief front and center.

“There were just beats that I felt like were almost too similar, as opposed to reflective,” she added. “I just wanted everything to feel like some version of an advancement, even if the advancement is someone feeling a different reaction to to the pain and loss. We also haven’t seen her have a reaction to what happened in Westview. Even if we watched her go through trauma and loss, we haven’t seen her go through the loss of the children. I think, for any parent – I would assume, because I’m not one – the loss of the child would always be much harder than the loss of anyone else important in your life. I just wanted to make sure it was a constant evolution forward and not repetitive. And so it was just slight adjustments. I couldn’t do any major changes because sets were being built and things like that. And schedules were being made, although in flux. But, yeah, I was trying to figure out how do we not be repetitive? How do we create an evolution? How do we make this different but still part of the woman that we know?”

May 09 2022
Press: Elizabeth Olsen Texted WandaVision Costar Paul Bettany ‘I Miss You’ amid Doctor Strange 2 Press

“I’m so used to doing press with him and I just miss him so much,” Olsen said at the premiere of Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness

PEOPLE: Elizabeth Olsen is taking a moment to think of her former onscreen husband while doing press for her latest Marvel movie.

The actress, 33, attended the premiere of Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness in Hollywood on Monday, the latest MCU franchise entry in which she reprises her role of Wanda Maximoff, also known as the Scarlet Witch.

Ahead of the film, Olsen spoke with PEOPLE, saying how it feels different this time around to be doing press and attending events without her former costar Paul Bettany. Bettany famously played Vision, a super-enhanced artificial intelligence that Olsen’s Wanda falls in love with over the course of the Avengers films and later, in the popular Marvel/Disney+ series WandaVision.

“I did text him last weekend and I was like, ‘I miss you,’ ” Olsen said, “because I’m so used to doing press with him and I just miss him so much and Wanda’s really alone in this film and I feel it as an actor.”

Bettany’s Vision character met his demise at the end of Avengers: Infinity War, and much of WandaVision recounts how Wanda grapples with his death — even creating a new version of him within a fabricated world.

Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, featuring Benedict Cumberbatch in the title role, is the first MCU installment with Olsen that does not also include Bettany.

Regarding Wanda/Scarlet Witch’s enthusiastic fan base thanks to WandaVision, Olsen also said on Monday night that being able to do the series ahead of this new movie “was an amazing opportunity.”

“I think because of the experience that the audience and the fans have had with WandaVision, they’ll have a different perspective coming into Dr. Strange, and I’m excited for the journey they’re about to see Wanda go on in this film.”

Rachel McAdams, Benedict Wong, and Chiwetel Ejiofor also return for the Doctor Strange sequel, in which multiple universes clash and intertwine.

Cumberbatch last appeared in his Avengers role in last year’s record-breaking hit Spider-Man: No Way Home, which meshed multiverses in the Spidey realm, mixing Tom Holland, Tobey Maguire and Andrew Garfield’s iterations of the character. Sam Raimi, who directed the early-2000s Maguire Spider-Man movies, directed Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness.

“The movie is a journey into the Multiverse, so you do see different iterations of Benedict Cumberbatch’s Doctor Strange, and even Lizzie Olsen’s character of Wanda Maximoff,” Raimi told Fandango last month. “So the actors have to play that. It’s a great challenge for them and great fun to direct them playing these altered versions of themselves.”

The director added, “I think Wanda’s magic, from Marvel lore, is more powerful than almost any of the other characters in this picture, but Doctor Strange has the knowledge of the mystic arts that Wanda doesn’t have, and he’s got the help of Kamar-Taj. If you were to pit them against each other, different altered versions of themselves … there could be a Doctor Strange out there that’s more powerful than our Wanda. Or there could be a Wanda out there who is more powerful than our Wanda here. So, because of these altered versions, it’s all a mixed bag of possibilities.”

Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, which follows 2016’s Doctor Strange, hits theaters Friday May 6.

May 09 2022
Press: Elizabeth Olsen Reveals Why She Gets ‘Feisty’ When People Criticize Marvel Movies

“I’m not saying we’re making indie art films,” Olsen said

HUFFPOST:The Scarlet Witch’s wrath might be deadly, but Elizabeth Olsen says she only gets a “little feisty” when people criticize Marvel movies.

While absolutely nobody needs to feel bad for a studio raking in box-office receipts by the billions, the Marvel Cinematic Universe has attracted a handful of high-profile detractors in recent years, including directors Martin Scorsese, Denis Villeneuve and Jane Campion, who’ve all essentially laid the death of cinema at its feet.

Olsen — who’s appeared in a string of Marvel projects since 2015, including the recent “Doctor Strange” sequel — understands the feedback, but she’s also pushing back against those who make superhero films “seem like a lesser type of art.”

“I’m not saying we’re making indie art films, but I just think it takes away from our crew, which bugs me,” she said in a new interview with The Independent. “These are some of the most amazing set designers, costume designers, camera operators ― I feel diminishing them with that kind of criticism takes away from all the people who do award-winning films, that also work on these projects.”

“From an actor’s point of view, whatever, I get it; I totally understand that there’s a different kind of performance that’s happening,” she continued. “But I do think throwing Marvel under the bus takes away from the hundreds of very talented crew people. That’s where I get a little feisty about that.”

Olsen got her start in a string of critically acclaimed indie films, including her big-screen debut in the 2011 thriller “Martha Marcy May Marlene,” before moving on to big-budget, special-effects-heavy fare.

Her latest Marvel blockbuster, “Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness,” arrived in theaters this weekend to the tune of an estimated $185 million in ticket sales, the biggest opening of any film in 2022.

As for whether she’ll return to her roots, Olsen has learned to keep her options open and the haters out of mind, adding that she’s ready to play in the Marvel sandbox again as long as “there’s a good idea attached to it.”

Noting that she initially was only contracted to appear in two movies and a cameo, Olsen said, “It continues to be a surprise when they want to use me for more projects.”

Next up for the actor, however, is a project hailing from an entirely different genre.

Olsen is set to star in “Love and Death,” an upcoming HBO Max limited series from writer and executive producer David E. Kelley about the true and very grisly story of Texas housewife Candy Montgomery, who famously killed her best friend from church with an ax.

May 09 2022
Gallery/Videos: “The Kelly Clarkson Show”

The whole “Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness” cast joined Kelly Clarkson on her show for discussions about the movie and a trivia game called ‘That’ll Do the Trick’.

 

May 09 2022
Interview/Gallery: The enchanting Elizabeth Olsen

 

 

HARPER’S BAZAAR: Elizabeth Olsen is ready for me. In a cosy room of a London hotel, she gets up from her chair to greet me, refreshingly bright-eyed for a Monday morning. She introduces herself warmly as “Lizzie” and asks if I want anything to drink. It’s immediately clear that there aren’t many parallels between her and her antiheroine alias, the Scarlet Witch (also known as Wanda). For one thing, Olsen is very funny; she’s also supremely likeable. But she does hold herself with a certain soft power, today dressed in a grey Barbara Bui suit, an acid-pink knitted rollneck and chunky black lace-up shoes from Clergerie.

Elizabeth Olsen is ready for me. In a cosy room of a London hotel, she gets up from her chair to greet me, refreshingly bright-eyed for a Monday morning. She introduces herself warmly as “Lizzie” and asks if I want anything to drink. It’s immediately clear that there aren’t many parallels between her and her antiheroine alias, the Scarlet Witch (also known as Wanda). For one thing, Olsen is very funny; she’s also supremely likeable. But she does hold herself with a certain soft power, today dressed in a grey Barbara Bui suit, an acid-pink knitted rollneck and chunky black lace-up shoes from Clergerie.

“I love playing characters whose actions people disagree with,” she says, tucking her cropped blonde hair behind her ears. “In a world where we don’t really care to understand other points of view, I feel like if we as an audience can have empathy for people we don’t agree with, that’s a good thing.” One of the most powerful figures in the Marvel Universe, Wanda straddles the morally dubious line between good and evil, and this is what interests Olsen about her; the characters she is most drawn to are the complex, knotty ones that need untangling. “Then I can kind of be their lawyer and defend them. I get behind their actions, even if I don’t agree with them,” she explains. She has recently wrapped an HBO series called Love and Death, which follows the true story of Candy Montgomery, who murdered a woman with an axe and acted as though it didn’t happen. “I adored playing her,” she says. “People would ask: ‘Are you going to play her as a sociopath?’ And I was like, ‘No, why would I do that? I’m going to try and understand how someone would be able to compartmentalise this until they were caught.”
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May 05 2022