Welcome to , Elizabeth Olsen Source, your best source for all things related to Elizabeth Olsen. Elizabeth's breakthrough came in 2011 when she starred in critically-acclaimed movies Martha Marcy May Marlene and Silent House. She made her name in indie movies until her role in 2014 blockbuster Godzilla and then as Scarlet Witch/Wanda Maximoff in Marvel's Avengersand Captain America movies. Elizabeth starred in and was an Executive Producer for Facebook Watch's "Sorry For Your Loss". She is currently starring in WandaVision, the first Marvel TV Series on Disney+. She will also be in Marvel's Dr. Strange sequel and hopefully we'll see another indie movie from her! Enjoy the many photos(including lots of exclusives!), articles, and videos on our site!

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Posted on June 10, 2021 / by AliKat / in Marvel, Press, Videos, WandaVision

‘WandaVision,’ ‘Falcon and Winter Soldier’ and ‘Loki’ Stars on Missing Tom Hiddleston’s Lectures and Who Texts Kevin Feige the Most

 

VARIETY: Being a superhero in the Marvel Cinematic Universe equips its stars with unique powers both on-screen and off.

“We all have a number sign above our heads when we make independent films [for] whether or not we can sell them internationally to help get financing,” says Elizabeth Olsen. “If we want to do that, it does allow us to be able to do that. So, I think that’s a great benefit to being a part of such a huge international franchise.”

Olsen first appeared as Wanda Maximoff, aka the Scarlet Witch, in Marvel Studios’ “Avengers: Age of Ultron” in 2015 before going onto such films as “Captain America: Civil War” and “Avengers: Endgame.” In-between she worked on indies including “Ingrid Goes West” and the television series “Sorry for Your Loss” for Facebook Watch. This past television season, though, she brought her big-screen superhero to Disney Plus, headlining “WandaVision” alongside Paul Bettany.

The ability to flit between platforms at all can be special for actors, but to do so with the same character is a testament to the power of the MCU. And Olsen and Bettany were only the first to move from film to TV under the Marvel Studios banner. Soon they were followed by Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan in “The Falcon and the Winter Soldier” and Tom Hiddleston in “Loki,” all of whom are taking part in a special panel at Variety’s Virtual TV Fest.

Despite the long and wide travels these performers take on with their Marvel roles, they are usually kept in the dark about the fates of their characters. After 2011’s “Captain America: The First Avenger,” Stan was not sure if he would be in another Marvel movie — until he got a call from a friend at San Diego Comic-Con, who told him that his character was in the title of the next film that had just been announced.

Stan and Mackie found out about “The Falcon and the Winter Soldier” in a similarly surprising way. The two were separately called to Los Angeles for meetings and ended up crossing paths in the hotel lobby.

“I had an idea of what was cooking, but I didn’t think it was going to be a TV show,” Mackie says of bumping into Stan. Initially, he admits, he was “horrified” by the idea of taking his character to Disney Plus.

“I was very afraid and very disappointed when I heard it was going to be a TV show because I didn’t think we could take the scope of what we had just done in all these movies and then put it on TV and it would work,” he says. “I didn’t want to be the first failed entity of Marvel. You have all this amazing stuff and then this one thing sucks and it just happens to be me. … I thought it was going to be like Batman and Robin — the original one — where it was like, ‘Pow! Bing!’”

It wasn’t until the production on the show started that Mackie says he understood they were maintaining the cinematic scope — and that he would be able to reconnect with all his MCU compatriots.

“When you become a part of the Marvel franchise, it’s almost like summer camp,” he says. “So when you show up to set, it’s everybody and you never miss a beat. Some people have kids, some people bought a car, some people did this, so it’s like you going back to seeing all your same friends over and over.”

The ability to flit between platforms at all can be special for actors, but to do so with the same character is a testament to the power of the MCU. And Olsen and Bettany were only the first to move from film to TV under the Marvel Studios banner. Soon they were followed by Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan in “The Falcon and the Winter Soldier” and Tom Hiddleston in “Loki,” all of whom are taking part in a special panel at Variety’s Virtual TV Fest.

Despite the long and wide travels these performers take on with their Marvel roles, they are usually kept in the dark about the fates of their characters. After 2011’s “Captain America: The First Avenger,” Stan was not sure if he would be in another Marvel movie — until he got a call from a friend at San Diego Comic-Con, who told him that his character was in the title of the next film that had just been announced.

Stan and Mackie found out about “The Falcon and the Winter Soldier” in a similarly surprising way. The two were separately called to Los Angeles for meetings and ended up crossing paths in the hotel lobby.

“I had an idea of what was cooking, but I didn’t think it was going to be a TV show,” Mackie says of bumping into Stan. Initially, he admits, he was “horrified” by the idea of taking his character to Disney Plus.

“I was very afraid and very disappointed when I heard it was going to be a TV show because I didn’t think we could take the scope of what we had just done in all these movies and then put it on TV and it would work,” he says. “I didn’t want to be the first failed entity of Marvel. You have all this amazing stuff and then this one thing sucks and it just happens to be me. … I thought it was going to be like Batman and Robin — the original one — where it was like, ‘Pow! Bing!’”

It wasn’t until the production on the show started that Mackie says he understood they were maintaining the cinematic scope — and that he would be able to reconnect with all his MCU compatriots.

“When you become a part of the Marvel franchise, it’s almost like summer camp,” he says. “So when you show up to set, it’s everybody and you never miss a beat. Some people have kids, some people bought a car, some people did this, so it’s like you going back to seeing all your same friends over and over.”






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