web analytics

Elizabeth Olsen Source

Best Source For All Things Elizabeth Olsen

Welcome to , Elizabeth Olsen Source, your best source for all things related to Elizabeth Olsen. Elizabeth's breakthrough came in 2011 when she starred in critically-acclaimed movies "Martha Marcy May Marlene" and "Silent House". She made her name in indie movies until her role in 2014 blockbuster Godzilla and then as Scarlet Witch/Wanda Maximoff in Marvel's Captain America: Winter Soldier, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Captain America: Civil War, and Avengers: Infinity War. Her recent starring role in Facebook Watch's "Sorry For Your Loss" included her first Executive Producer position. Enjoy the many photos(including lots of exclusives!), articles, and videos on our site!

Press/Gallery: Elizabeth Olsen On Exploring Grief In “Sorry For Your Loss”

We sit down with the actress and executive producer to talk about the meaning of true strength and knowing when it’s time to slow down.

 

COVETEUR – The two times we met Elizabeth Olsen couldn’t be more different. The first, we were dancing all night long and hiking all day in the middle of Utah’s Canyon Point for our mutual friend Andi Potamkin’s wedding at Amangiri. It was one for the books. This time, we swapped the champagne for sparkling water on a packed press day during the pinnacle of TIFF and nestled into a booth to talk about Olsen’s elegant performance (and her debut as executive producer) in Facebook Watch’s episodic series Sorry for Your Loss. Olsen plays Leigh, a bereaved widow struggling to navigate her new life—a role that has her gracefully vacillating between debilitating mourning and comfort in memories (as shown in flashbacks), and the challenges within the banality of everyday life between. The realistic portrayal of grief depicted in Sorry for Your Loss, Olsen tells us, made her re-examine the meaning of true strength (hint: it’s not the antiquated belief that hiding emotion during a time of mourning is a strength). We chatted about what it took to prep for a complex role, her new venture into producing, and played a quick-fire round of Qs.

How did you get involved with this project?

“I had read the script three years ago. I had just gone through, not a death, but a loss and a life adjustment, so I related to my character [and the feeling of] being completely confused about how to move forward. We haven’t really told an authentic story about grief and the everyday—how it’s not something that you go through the stages and get out on the other side. It’s a continual adjustment to your life, and you can’t do anything but move forward.

“I always think about how we all have a backpack of shit that we carry with us from all the trauma that we’ve experienced (or all the loss we’ve had or the pains we’ve gone through) that are unique to each individual person. We walk through life with this weight on our back, but we walk through it anyway; you’re fine, and that’s just you. And then you add an extra loss, or something new, an adjustment, and it becomes a huge new weight—you never lose the weight, it never goes away, you just adjust how you walk through life and move forward. [Sorry for Your Loss] is not fancy and it’s not dramatic, but what I love about the show is that it gets cozy in the mundane and the monotony of that experience, how long it takes, and how it never goes away. You continue to have relationships with this person [you lost].”

Did you find it challenging capturing the complexities of grief?
Continue reading “Press/Gallery: Elizabeth Olsen On Exploring Grief In “Sorry For Your Loss””

Press: Elizabeth Olsen on ‘Making Peace’ With Grief in ‘Sorry for Your Loss’

VARIETY – Elizabeth Olsen has been appearing in films since she was about four years old, but her acting career began in earnest with the 2011 film “Martha Marcy May Marlene.” Now she’s trying her hand at the small-screen with “Sorry for Your Loss,” a which she not only stars in but also executive produces.

“Long-form has always been interesting to me because all of the different turns a character can take and change and evolve over time,” Olsen tells Variety. “And with Kit [Steinkellner]’s pilot, I just found not only the character could be someone that I immediately felt connection to — it made me laugh, it made me cry — and it was at a time in my life where I was in a transition.”

The show, which will launch the first four episodes at once on Facebook Watch Sept. 18, centers on Olsen’s character Leigh, a recent widow, as she struggles to get through the days without her husband and, to some degree, reassess their relationship since it came to a premature end.

“There are so many stories about love, but the stories about death all feel so sappy to me or melodramatic,” Olsen says, “and I just feel like this handled grief in a palatable way where it can actually be a part of a conversation and be an interesting character study of someone going through an extreme trauma for the first time.”
Continue reading “Press: Elizabeth Olsen on ‘Making Peace’ With Grief in ‘Sorry for Your Loss’”

Gallery/Video: Off Camera

Elizabeth appeared on the Off Camera show with Sam Jones. You can purchase the whole episode on the website. Here are two previews and the magazine and photoshoot that goes along with it.

 

 
Gallery Links:

Elizabeth Olsen had a very unusual childhood. As the other sister to the Olsen twins, Elizabeth had a front row seat to her sisters’ experience in the spotlight, media circus included, but she also witnessed what it was like to be a working actor—something she wanted to be but was embarrassed to admit. As she says, “I had this fear that people would think I didn’t earn or deserve the things I worked for because of who I was naturally associated with.”

The nepotism critique motivated her to prove her worth, but really, Elizabeth’s a hard worker by nature. After all, you don’t get dubbed NYU’s notorious “Rehearsal Nazi” for nothing. And the hard work paid off because she started getting roles, including the one that led to her breakout performance in Martha Marcy May Marlene, before she graduated college. Since then, Elizabeth has conquered the world of independent film (Wind River, Kodachrome, Ingrid Goes West) and joined Marvel’s Avengers franchise as superhero Scarlet Witch.

She may play a superhero, but she’s still got her head screwed on straight when it comes seeing fame and adulation for what it actually is. She’s the kind of actor who loves the work, the craft, and she’s also the kind of artist who wants to take risks. Her newest project, Sorry for Your Loss, is a Facebook Watch series that explores grief, an uncomfortable subject that isn’t often examined in Western culture. But as you’ll see, Elizabeth will rise to any challenge thrown her way.

Elizabeth joins Off Camera to talk about the biggest lesson she’s learned from her family, why she may be one of the few actors who likes to audition, and why she’s the most Zen type A person you’ll ever meet.

Continue reading “Gallery/Video: Off Camera”

Press: Elizabeth Olsen opens up about experiencing panic attacks

Elizabeth Olsen opens up about experiencing panic attacks, and why she ‘didn’t want anyone to know’ at the time

 

YAHOO – The statuesque Elizabeth Olsen is the picture of poise, but she has ups and downs, just like the rest of us. The actress revealed to Build on Wednesday that while filming a movie earlier in her career, she began to experience panic attacks.

Olsen was visiting Build to promote her new Facebook Watch show Sorry for Your Loss. When asked about some of the most important lessons she’s learned from other actors, the 29-year-old got candid about her time on the set of a 2012 movie, Red Lights, working with legends like Sigourney Weaver and Robert De Niro.

“I did this movie called Red Lights that no one saw,” she recalled. “It was actually a really weird time in my life because I was experiencing panic attacks for the first time.”

She kept her struggle to herself, however, for fear of professional complications.

“I didn’t want anyone to know, because I thought they wouldn’t insure me or something,” she said.

And it wasn’t just one or two incidents. “I kept having panic attacks while filming, but I didn’t let anyone know. It was really weird.”

Continue reading “Press: Elizabeth Olsen opens up about experiencing panic attacks”

Gallery/Video: Build Series Appearance

   
 

Gallery Links:

 

Gallery/Video: Sway’s Universe (Sirius XM) Interview

   
 

Gallery Links:

 

Press: Inside the surprisingly low-key world of a Marvel superhero

The actress opens up about ignoring Hollywood norms and why she’ll never enjoy Instagram

 

 

HARPERS BAZAAR – Marvel films don’t often go hand in hand with low-key actresses. Big Hollywood blockbusters tend to act as magnets for showy, big-time names and the kind of stars who like to eat out at flashy restaurants amid wails of dwindling privacy. Elizabeth Olsen is an anomaly to the formula.

 

For the past three years, the LA-based actress has played Scarlet Witch in the Avengers franchise, a superhero who can alter both probability and reality. Next week sees the culmination of the Marvel film series – the release of Avengers: Infinity War, which brings the giant superhero ensemble together. The cast is huge and the hype is massive, and yet Elizabeth Olsen would rather be at home with her friends putting her newfound break-making skills to the test.

 

“If I could do whatever I wanted for the day, I’d start with going to the gym or doing some sort of workout, then I’d go to the grocery store because my favourite thing to do is grocery shop,” she says. “The night before I would have prepped bread, like dough, then the next day I’d bake bread and create a delicious meal, sit outside in the sun, eat delicious food all day with people I love.”

 

It sounds like every clichéd LA wellness trend wrapped up in one, the type of day you’ve seen over and again on influencer Instagram pages. But none of it is is designed to be broadcast – Olsen isn’t keen on social media (in fact, one of her latest films, Ingrid Goes West explored the dark ridiculousness of Instagram); she only recently joined and, to her horror, has already amassed 1.1 million followers.

Continue reading “Press: Inside the surprisingly low-key world of a Marvel superhero”

Press/Gallery: Elizabeth Olsen Talks Robert Downey Jr, Skipping the Oscars, and Moving to England

Her sisters might make the headlines, but Elizabeth Olsen prefers to fly under the radar.

 

 

THE SUNDAY TIMES STYLE – It’s cold in Hollywood. On a backlot in Studio City that has more in common with an Essex construction site, I’m shivering in a temporary office, waiting for a gofer who I’m told will take me to Elizabeth Olsen. I watch the back of a tall brunette in a backwards baseball cap and Timberlands and contemplate where Olsen could possibly be in all this prosaic functionality. Ensconced, I suspect, in one of those “better” places reserved for cast, sipping something hot with almond milk. Only when the runner turns around to approach me… She is Elizabeth Olsen. “I’d love to say I drink coffee with almond milk,” she says, her voice low, wry and husky, “but it tastes f****** disgusting.”

 

On the Hollywood behavioural spectrum, the 29-year-old Olsen — Lizzie to those who know her — is at the end marked “very unshowy”. “When I get photographed, it’s never leaving a cool restaurant,” she says drily. “I’m always at the grocery store buying toilet paper.” This is all the more impressive given her lineage: her older sisters are twins Mary-Kate and Ashley, 31, the child TV stars turned fashion designers of The Row — their diffusion line, Elizabeth and James, is named after her and her brother. I’ve been warned not to talk too much about her sisters, but when I do, Olsen gets it: “Of course people are curious. When you have a public figure in your family, people forget that you have, like, 800 other members of it.” She has made occasional appearances on the brand’s front row, as well as at Miu Miu — Mrs Prada gave her the seal of approval when she cast Olsen for an ad campaign in 2014, a signal that she was the Chloë Sevigny-like girl of the moment. More recently, she has starred in H&M’s SS18 campaign film dancing the tango with Winona Ryder.

 

In general, however, the younger Olsen has eschewed all Hollywood peacockery. In fact, in the seven years since her breakthrough lead as the escapee from an abusive cult in Martha Marcy May Marlene, which led to a Bafta rising-star nomination and a quiet reputation for dark indie films, the only scandalous headline she’s had is (and I paraphrase): “Elizabeth Olsen is so low-key.” “‘She’s high-strung but low-key!’” she drawls, nailing the sarcasm. “‘She has a hundred neuroses, but so low-key.’”

 

She takes me to her new “office”, a prefab that resembles a halfway house, empty but for a hefty brown sofa that looks like vintage DFS; she curls up on it cupping a grim-looking takeaway tea. From here she will be executive producing and starring in a 10-part dramedy about a grieving widow called Sorry for Your Loss, for Facebook’s new streaming platform, Watch. As this is a #MeToo world, the team have just watched a video on harassment in the workplace and listened to a talk by a lawyer. “I was like, ‘Wow, this is really f****** thorough.’ Apparently even if someone overhears something really inappropriate that’s still considered harassment. Even though it’s not told to them directly. I was, like, ‘This is crazy shit.’”

 

Olsen admits she is one of the least likely people to collaborate with a social-media company: “I told them, ‘I’m not gonna create a Facebook page for my character.’” Until recently she was a confirmed iPhobe, but she reluctantly joined Instagram two years ago and now has 1.1m followers, which she finds amusing: “I don’t understand the acronyms, but I figured that #WCW was Woman Crush Wednesday.” She posted a picture of her “inspiration”, former jailbird Martha Stewart. “All I want to do is be a homemaker. I started baking bread in January,” she declares rather maniacally. “I want to make my own yeast next.”

Continue reading “Press/Gallery: Elizabeth Olsen Talks Robert Downey Jr, Skipping the Oscars, and Moving to England”